Posh, Street, Rap or Regional – Who Cares When We Can Understand What YOU Say

Stacey Dooley’s open faced, clearly spoken interviews with people who responded to her questions and her direct speech to camera, brought into perspective the true nature of the manufacture and trade of Cocaine in Peru, in the BBC documentary. While I was really interested in what she was saying – I didn’t get sidelined by her accent. Stacey Dooley is pleased to have a Luton accent and looks and sounds confident. She’s been encouraged to do so.  Certainly by the BBC.
Claire Balding may have done an equally good job in that she’s a talented presenter who also knows how to connect with and respond to people. Cambridge educated Claire Balding sounds comfortable. She’s been encouraged to do so. They both have different accents and they both feel comfortable with them.
It’s how you use your voice and speech to express yourself that matters.   Sad to say – people used to be bullied (especially at school) or sidelined because the way they spoke was different.
We can’t all be presenters, musicians and football players. In day to day life it may be that you need to pronounce the odd “th” instead of “f” and “ll” instead of “w”,  just because you can.  Conversely you may want to drop the odd “t” because you can.  This is about the use and knowledge of the English language in the present day.

Stacey Dooley
Stacey Dooley
Clare Balding
Clare Balding