How We Construct Our Emotions

Lisa Feldman Barratt has written an excellent book: “How Emotions are Made” giving new insights into the emotions that we see and hear in the voices surrounding us. She writes that we construct our emotions so that we can understand the world around us. We then place an identifying “sticker” of an emotion on the experience which we then identify as an emotional recall. The book is fascinating as it gives new research into positive as well as negative emotions as activated by the amygdala. The understanding of the map of the brain and our emotions is growing. Real situations can give us conflicting emotions, but when we’re listening to actors or singers who have their emotions close to the surface then we are able to empathize and readily “feel” their emotions.  Now we know how Dr Chekov heard and saw and was able to write those amazingly raw scenes of conflicting emotions.
How Emotions are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett is published by Macmillan

Lisa Feldman Barrett
Lisa Feldman Barrett

Confidence in your Voice

With so many talented young people emerging from the arts and sciences, we need to have accessible support services in place to help them.  Throughout the early part of their working life, it’s important that people have the confidence to overcome what every talented person faces – criticism.  From others and from themselves.

“One needs very strong ears to hear oneself freely criticized; and since there are few who can stand it without being stung, those who venture to perform this service for us give us a remarkable proof of their friendship.” Montaigne

Friends and family may want to help but there isn’t enough time to really mentor others when most people are already preoccupied with either their own career path or keeping a balance within the family. It is crucial at an early stage in your career,  to have someone to turn to for help and advice, someone who you can talk with freely.  This is why a mentor; a truly good mentor can change your life for the good.  Many young people opt to conform to values that they don’t necessarily believe in because they are afraid to offend others and don’t have the confidence to speak up for themselves.   This shows in your voice and gives others a message that you’re insecure rather than secure in your belief of your own talent.  The Prince’s Trust, that helped me when I first started Max Your Voice, has joined forces with L’Oreal in a campaign to help build young people’s confidence.  Dame Helen Mirren is backing the campaign and has some great advice for young (and old) women:
“Be free be liberated, be what you want to be.  It’s to do with liberation, not sexiness, that’s in the past.”

Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren

Ask yourself “What is it that I want?”
lorealparis.co.uk/princestrust