Learning Lines Off By Heart

Sir Salman Rushdie is an advocate of  memorising  and speaking poetry and prose.  He believes it enriches our relationship with language and I certainly go along with that.   The rhythms of lines and words written for speaking out loud, echo in our heart and mind long after they’re spoken.
“It is a simple exercise that enriches the way you enjoy poems and enriches your relationship with language and once you have done it – it stays with you forever.” Salman Rushdie.
Anyone who’s learned songs and poems in a different language to their own – before even understanding the meaning – will know how it inspires you to enjoy making the sounds of the words and inspires you to find the meaning of the words.
Christine and the Queens – speaking in French in those very appealing clear French sounds, gets you listening and memorising.
Some rap artists are putting their message across in words delivered with fantastic rhythmic precision and defiance.   Others like George the Poet are giving  hope to people on the edge of depression.

A couple of lines learned and spoken just once a day can help lift your spirits and freshen you up.
Nonsense poetry like Jabberwocky is great for just beating out the sounds and making yourself and others laugh.  The Foals words charge your imagination and take you to another land.

`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
Lewis Carroll

Now the wolf is knocking at my door
Bang-bangin’, ask for more
Stand here, we stand tall
You can move beyond these walls
The Foals

The Foals
The Foals

 

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